NDiaye A Man Booker International Finalist

Marie NDiaye has already made history by becoming the first black woman to win the Prix Goncourt (for Three Strong Women). Now she has been pharmacy in canada named as the youngest ever finalist for the Man International Booker Prize. She joins nine other authors on the shortlist: pharmacy in canada U R Ananthamurthy (India), Aharon Appelfeld (Israel), Lydia Davis (USA), Intizar Husain (Pakistan),Yan Lianke (China), Marie NDiaye (France), Josip …

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Maclehose Press books of the year

Just as Jérôme Ferrari was awarded the Prix Goncourt a few weeks ago, the Books of the Year round-ups began to appear in the press and his novel Where I Left My Soul (trs. Geoffrey Strachan) kept cropping up. It was described by Michael Holroyd in the Guardian as “The most powerful novel I have read this year . . . a devastating story that shows how the victims of torture …

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Three Strong Women

Marie NDiaye’s astounding Goncourt-winning Three Strong Women (translated by John Fletcher) is being published by in America by Alfred A. Knopf, and this Sunday it has been reviewed in the New York Time Book Review. It was quite an in-depth review, but here are a few choice snippets: Publishers in the United States [are introducing] American readers to a new generation of hugely gifted French writers who are reworking the …

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Three Strong Women: Times Review

There was a splendid short review of Three Strong Women in The Times last weekend, from Kate Saunders, who contributes the fiction round-ups: “This beautiful novel tells the linked stories of three women caught between Dakar and France . . . NDiaye’s writing is extraordinarily powerful, and she is very well served by John Fletcher’s elegant, economical translation” It’s worth mentioning that NDiaye’s novel has won literary awards in three …

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May I Interest You In?

This month there are no fewer than three new books from the MacLehose stable, two fiction and one non-fiction, a Goncourt winner, an Italian novel about the Sardinian Robin Hood and travelogue about a country that no longer exists . . . Marie NDiaye must be (or perhaps have been?) the most precocious author on the MacLehose list. Her first novel was published when she was just seventeen: the story …

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