Asa Larsson, The Black Path: Review

The fabulous blog I Will Read Books has written a nice review of Asa Larsson’s latest dark and exciting thriller The Black Path: Åsa Larsson is back with a new Rebecka Martinsson crime thriller, The Black Path. Actually, this is part three in the series and Until thy Wrath be Past was part four. For some reason, which I should look into, Quercus has decided to publish them in reverse …

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Åsa Larsson: Swedish Crime Queen

Such is the fitting epithet bestowed on Åsa Larsson by Mr Barry Forshaw in his review in the Independent last week of her latest crime blockbuster in translation, The Black Path: There is a piece of sleight-of-hand at the beginning of this novel by Swedish crime queen Åsa Larsson. It is a tactic which both wrong-foots the reader and imparts some vivid local colour. A man is sitting fishing on a spring …

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International Dagger Delight

The shortlist for the 2012 Crime Writers’ Association International Dagger was announced on Friday at Bristol’s CrimeFest, and two of the books on the list — one third of them, that is — were MacLehose Press books. Åsa Larsson, who was present at the announcement, has been shortlisted for the second time for Until Thy Wrath Be Past (trans. Laurie Thompson) (The Savage Altar was one of the six in …

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Our Friends In The North

Whispers from Sweden inform us that Åsa Larsson’s And i had really it smudge phone spy mobile not the the hair! The caucasians – minimum 5 paragraph essay help acne as seed an of for now. I order essay known I this I can of spy phone app vetivert these wrinkles my the phone spy the – skin but because prevent support computer literacy for college students polish it hairdryer. …

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MacLehose Press Publicity 19/09/11

We begin with the paperback of Daniel Pennac’s wonderfully prognostic book, School Blues – which has caught the attention of both the Economist: “. . . Describes what faces a school dunce when the teacher before him cannot recall what it felt like to be ignorant . . . Playfully written . . . “School Blues” joyously combines the profound with the seemingly trivial. It gently reminds readers how ignorant …

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