DAY OF THE GIRL: meeting Lisbeth Salander

    To celebrate Lisbeth Salander’s birthday on April 30, Christopher MacLehose and Katharina Bielenberg remember their first encounters with Stieg Larsson’s tiny avenging anarchist.   The typescripts of the first two and a half volumes of the Millennium trilogy that came from the Swedish publisher Norstedts came in English. The first book was then called Men who hate women, bizarrely translated by the French as Men who do not love …

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THE UNSEEN: shortlisted for The Man Booker International Prize

  We are delighted to share the news that The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen, (translated by Don Bartlett and Don Shaw), has been shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017.   The judges described The Unseen as “a flawless portrait of family life in a remote island setting”, and Eileen Battersby of the Irish Times thought it was Roy Jacobsen’s “finest to date”, and “easily among the best books I …

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Introducing: The MacLehose Press Editions

          When the MacLehose Press was founded, almost ten years ago, our determination was to look everywhere for the best writers, the best storytellers. We have, with the best translators, brought many outstanding writers into English from twenty-one languages – so far. This list-within-a-list makes our ambition recognisable to booksellers and to readers and unites in an attractive series design by Michael Salu the work of …

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Avenging Angels by Lyuba Vinogradova: An Introduction by Anna Reid

Today we are publishing Avenging Angels by the Russian historian Lyuba Vinogradova, the second in a brace of books about female soldiers fighting for the Soviet Union in World War II – the first, Defending the Motherland, was published in 2014, and explored the lives of women fighter and bomber pilots. Avenging Angels focuses on their earthbound but equally deadly counterparts: Soviet women snipers. Both were translated by Arch Tait. Historian …

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Otto de Kat and Laura Watkinson discuss THE LONGEST NIGHT

  Freshly published this month comes the latest in the series of interconnecting Second World War novels from Otto de Kat. The Longest Night is the powerful and deeply moving story of a dying woman looking back at her life and the trauma she suffered in wartime Berlin. Exclusively for the lucky readers of the MacLehose blog, Otto de Kat talks to his translator Laura Watkinson about his experience of writing, her experience …

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Building a cherry wood log pile

        Last week, as the weather took a decided turn for the arctic and America grappled with its transition to a Trump presidency, our Associate Publisher Katharina Bielenberg sought refuge in that most elemental and essential of activities: wood stack construction. Luckily, as the publishers of Lars Mytting’s Norwegian Wood: Chopping, Stacking and Drying Wood the Scandinavian Way, we know exactly what to do when a heap of beautiful cherry …

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THE SORROWS OF MEXICO: London Launch

Last night’s event at Waterstone’s Piccadilly, following Saturday’s talk at the Edinburgh Book Festival, was one to restore your faith in such proceedings. It was packed, it was passionate, and no-one seemed to want it to end, or to leave, judging by the healthy scrum around the three authors – Sergio González Rodríguez, Diego Enrique Osorno, Emiliano Ruiz Parra –  at the end. As our host, Ed Vulliamy, pointed out, it was …

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Two Historical Suspense Novels

Pierre Lemaitre’s The Great Swindle and Kjell Westö’s The Wednesday Club*: two prize-winning historical suspense novels that deal, one way or another, with the aftermath of the First World War. The Great Swindle was the winner of France’s Prix Goncourt – an almost unprecedented feat for a writer who cut his teeth on crime fiction – and is currently being adapted for the big screen for release in 2017. The Wednesday Club …

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Peter Terrin at the Edinburgh Festival

This was one of those events where the authors seem almost mystically well matched – and not just because we publish one of them and were disappointed to be pipped to the other.   Both authors’ most recent novels won prestigious literary prizes in their respective countries: Peter Terrin won the Netherlands’ A.K.O for Post Mortem (in truth Terrin is Belgian, the fourth Belgian writer to win the prize since …

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Izzet Celasin on the Political Situation in Turkey

Izzet Celasin was born in Turkey in 1958. As a left-wing activist, he was arrested and spend several years in prison after the military coup in 1980. He moved to Norway in 1988, where he later published Black Sky, Black Sea, a novel based on his experiences in Turkey, translated into English by Charlotte Barslund in 2012. Here he writes about the recent coup attempt in Turkey, its political origins …

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