THE SORROWS OF MEXICO: London Launch

Last night’s event at Waterstone’s Piccadilly, following Saturday’s talk at the Edinburgh Book Festival, was one to restore your faith in such proceedings. It was packed, it was passionate, and no-one seemed to want it to end, or to leave, judging by the healthy scrum around the three authors – Sergio González Rodríguez, Diego Enrique Osorno, Emiliano Ruiz Parra –  at the end. As our host, Ed Vulliamy, pointed out, it was …

Continue reading

Two Historical Suspense Novels

Pierre Lemaitre’s The Great Swindle and Kjell Westö’s The Wednesday Club*: two prize-winning historical suspense novels that deal, one way or another, with the aftermath of the First World War. The Great Swindle was the winner of France’s Prix Goncourt – an almost unprecedented feat for a writer who cut his teeth on crime fiction – and is currently being adapted for the big screen for release in 2017. The Wednesday Club …

Continue reading

Peter Terrin at the Edinburgh Festival

This was one of those events where the authors seem almost mystically well matched – and not just because we publish one of them and were disappointed to be pipped to the other.   Both authors’ most recent novels won prestigious literary prizes in their respective countries: Peter Terrin won the Netherlands’ A.K.O for Post Mortem (in truth Terrin is Belgian, the fourth Belgian writer to win the prize since …

Continue reading

Izzet Celasin on the Political Situation in Turkey

Izzet Celasin was born in Turkey in 1958. As a left-wing activist, he was arrested and spend several years in prison after the military coup in 1980. He moved to Norway in 1988, where he later published Black Sky, Black Sea, a novel based on his experiences in Turkey, translated into English by Charlotte Barslund in 2012. Here he writes about the recent coup attempt in Turkey, its political origins …

Continue reading

Introducing: THE SORROWS OF MEXICO

      This Thursday, we are proud to be publishing The Sorrows of Mexico, a crucial collection of writings from seven of Mexico’s finest journalists, laying bare the violence and corruption behind the murders of over a hundred Mexican journalists.   Veering between carnival and apocalypse, Mexico has in the last ten years become the epicentre of the international drug trade. The so-called “war on drugs” has been a …

Continue reading

A WRITER’S ROOM THEY SAID by Anuradha Roy

        In her 1929 essay, A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf famously expounded the necessity of writers having the literal and figurative space to write. Whilst her essay particularly skewers the limitations for women writers within an early twentieth century literary landscape that was dominated by men, the spaces that writers inhabit whilst they work have always held a particular fascination for their readers. From writers’ “shelfies” and workspaces …

Continue reading

Introducing: THE RETURN by Dulce Maria Cardoso

      Today marks the UK publication of Dulce Maria Cardoso’s dazzling coming-of-age pocket masterpiece, The Return. Translated by Ángel Gurría Quintana, and based in part on the author’s own childhood experiences, The Return is the story of a young boy, Rui, and his family’s return to the mysterious Motherland following the Angolan War of Independence.   LUANDA, 1975. The Angolan War of Independence has been raging for at …

Continue reading

Lydie Salvayre discusses CRY, MOTHER SPAIN with Ben Faccini

      This week, we are delighted to be publishing Cry, Mother Spain, Lydie Salvayre’s prize-winning account of the life of her mother during the early months of the Spanish Civil War. Here, in this exclusive interview, she discusses her remarkable novel with her translator, Ben Faccini.     Ben Faccini: What got you started on the writing of Cry, Mother Spain? Was it an image or a memory? What set …

Continue reading

Introducing: CRY, MOTHER SPAIN by Lydie Salvayre

    Ahead of its publication on Thursday, we are delighted to give you an advance preview of Lydie Savayre’s Goncourt-winning masterpiece, Cry, Mother Spain, translated by Ben Faccini:   Aged fifteen, as Franco’s forces begin their murderous purges and cities across Spain rise up against the old order, Montse has never heard the word fascista before. In any case, the villagers say facha (the ch is a real Spanish …

Continue reading